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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000 Nov;81(11):1511-6.

Immediate response of glenohumeral abduction range of motion to a caudally directed translational mobilization: a fresh cadaver simulation.

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1
Department of Physical Therapy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the immediate effect of caudal glide translational mobilization on the range of motion (ROM) of passive glenohumeral abduction with a fresh cadaver model to simulate the mobilization movement performed by a physical therapist treating patients with glenohumeral hypomobility.

DESIGN:

Mechanical simulation of caudal glide mobilization and abduction torque range of motion (TROM) measurement of the glenohumeral joint with 2 material testing systems. Mobilizations were conducted with the glenohumeral joint positioned at a resting position (IGR) and at the end range of abduction (IGE).

SETTING:

Biomechanics laboratory.

CADAVERS:

Twenty fresh shoulder specimens from 10 cadavers (mean age, 68 +/- 8 yr).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Changes in TROM of the glenohumeral abduction in response to 5 bouts of caudal glide mobilization.

RESULTS:

At least 3 repetitions of TROM were required to attain consistent measurements on glenohumeral abduction ROM. Significant differences were found among changes in TROM because of rest, IGR, and IGE (Kruskal-Wallis statistics, (chi2 = 14.58, p = .001). A greater increase in glenohumeral abduction TROM was found after IGE (mean +/- standard error of the mean, 4.38 degrees +/- 0.95 degrees) compared with the rest control (0.03 degrees +/- 0.07 degrees; Mann-Whitney test, p = .001, alpha = .017) or its IGR counterpart (0.26 degrees +/- 0.46 degrees, p = .001, alpha = .017).

CONCLUSION:

This simulation of caudal glide translational mobilization at the end range using cadaver models improved passive glenohumeral abduction ROM but was ineffective when performed with the shoulder placed in a resting position. The mechanical responses of the glenohumeral joint to translational mobilization in a live patient may be similar, but some caution should be used in generalizing these findings.

PMID:
11083357
DOI:
10.1053/apmr.2000.9389
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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