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Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Oct;11(9):791-7.

Is there an association between alcohol intake or smoking and small bowel adenocarcinoma? Results from a European multi-center case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark. L.kaerlev@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To discover whether tobacco smoking and intake of different types of alcoholic drinks are associated with small bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA).

METHODS:

A population-based European multi-center case-control study was conducted from 1995 to 1997.

RESULTS:

After a histological review using uniform diagnostic criteria, 47 (33%) of the 142 identified cases of SBA were excluded due to reclassification as either tumors of the papilla of Vater (n = 22), stromal tumors, or metastases; 95 cases were accepted for study. In all, 70 cases of SBA together with 2070 controls matched by age, sex, and region were interviewed. A high intake (more than 24 g alcohol per day) of beer or spirits was associated with SBA, an odds ratio (OR) of 3.5 and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 1.5-8.0 and 3.4 (95% CI 1.3-9.2), respectively). There was no association with wine intake or total alcohol intake. Tobacco smoking was probably unrelated to SBA.

CONCLUSIONS:

A high intake of beer or spirits seems to be a risk factor for SBA. Since this association was not seen for wine drinkers, protective components of wine may counterbalance a carcinogenic effect of alcohol on the small bowel. Alternatively, the result may be confounded by other factors, e.g. dietary factors.

PMID:
11075867
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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