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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2000 Sep;83(1):95-8.

Changes in plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists in response to adrenaline infusion in humans.

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1
Department of Infectious Diseases M7721, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

To investigate the possible role of adrenaline in the response of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonists (ra) to extreme physiological conditions such as trauma and exercise, we examined the concentrations in the plasma of these cytokines during an adrenaline infusion. Given the fact that HIV infected patients have elevated levels of IL-6 in plasma, 12 HIV seropositive subjects and 6 HIV seronegative control subjects received a 1-h adrenaline infusion. Baseline concentrations of IL-6 and IL-1ra were higher in the HIV patients compared with the controls (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively), being most pronounced in the untreated subgroup of HIV infected patients (n = 6). The plasma concentration of adrenaline had increased 24-fold after 15 min of adrenaline infusion. The plasma concentration of IL-6 had increased by two- to threefold after 45 min of adrenaline infusion (P<0.01) and was still elevated 1 h after the infusion had ended (P<0.001 and P<0.05 in controls and HIV infected patients, respectively). The plasma concentration of IL-1ra had increased two- to threefold 1 h after ceasing the adrenaline infusion (P<0.05 and P<0.01 in controls and HIV infected patients, respectively). The relative increase in the cytokine levels was similar in controls and HIV infected patients. Thus, HIV infection did not influence the effect of adrenaline on IL-6 and IL-1ra. The present study supports the existence of a relationship between the plasma concentration of adrenaline and IL-6. It is possible that an increased adrenaline concentration in plasma induces a continued de novo synthesis of IL-6, thereby increasing plasma IL-6 in a time-dose dependent manner.

PMID:
11072780
DOI:
10.1007/s004210000257
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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