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Biol Psychiatry. 2000 Oct 15;48(8):813-29.

Neuroimaging studies of mood disorders.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies of major depression have identified neurophysiologic abnormalities in multiple areas of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex, the amygdala, and related parts of the striatum and thalamus. Some of these abnormalities appear mood state-dependent and are located in regions where cerebral blood flow increases during normal and other pathologic emotional states. These neurophysiologic differences between depressives and control subjects may thus implicate areas where physiologic activity changes to mediate or respond to the emotional, behavioral, and cognitive manifestations of major depressive episodes. Other abnormalities persist following symptom remission, and are found in orbital and medial prefrontal cortex areas where postmortem studies demonstrate reductions in cortex volume and histopathologic changes in primary mood disorders. These areas appear to modulate emotional behavior and stress responses, based upon evidence from brain mapping, lesion analysis, and electrophysiologic studies of humans and/or experimental animals. Dysfunction involving these regions is thus hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of depressive symptoms. Taken together, these findings implicate interconnected neural circuits in which pathologic patterns of neurotransmission may result in the emotional, motivational, cognitive, and behavioral manifestations of primary and secondary affective disorders.

PMID:
11063977
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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