Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Behav Res Ther. 2000 Nov;38(11):1117-24.

Suppressing and attending to pain-related thoughts in chronic pain patients.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, UK. allison.harvey@psy.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

Attempted suppression of pain-related thoughts was investigated in consecutive referrals for pain management (N = 39). Participants monitored their pain-related thoughts for three 5-min periods. In period 1, all participants were instructed to think about anything. For period 2, participants were instructed to either suppress pain-related thoughts, attend to pain-related thoughts, or to continue to think about anything. In period 3, all participants were again instructed to think about anything. Participants instructed to attend to their pain reported more pain-related thoughts than suppressors and controls in both periods 2 and 3. Suppressors experienced reduced pain-related thoughts during period 2. There was no immediate enhancement or delayed increase.

PMID:
11060940
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center