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Pediatr Int. 2000 Oct;42(5):508-13.

Role of infection in the development of acquired subglottic stenosis in neonates with prolonged intubation.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi, Japan. suzumura@dokkyomed.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether clinically diagnosed infection correlates with subsequent development of subglottic stenosis in intubated neonates.

METHODS:

Sixty-two neonatal infants intubated for more than 14 days were examined. Several risk factors for subglottic stenosis, including infection, duration of intubation, frequency of intubation, the size of the endotracheal tube etc., were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Infection that occurred within 14 days of intubation showed a positive correlation with subsequent subglottic stenosis. The duration of intubation, frequency of intubation and the size of the endotracheal tube did not affect the development of subglottic stenosis. The majority of infections were considered to be respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Infection occurring within 14 days of intubation is considered to be a risk factor for acquired subglottic stenosis in neonates intubated for more than 14 days. Prevention of infection within 14 days of intubation may reduce the incidence of subglottic stenosis in neonates.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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