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Int J Med Microbiol. 2000 Mar;290(1):27-35.

Bacterial adhesins: function and structure.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby. impk@pop.dtu.dk

Abstract

Specific adhesion to host tissue cells is an essential virulence factor of most bacterial pathogens. The fundamental processes that determine bacterial attachment to host tissue surfaces are mediated by microbial adhesins. Host specificity and tissue tropism are characteristics exhibited by different bacteria and are determined (at least in part) by the interaction between adhesins and their complementary receptors on host cell surfaces. A detailed picture of how bacteria are able to target to various receptors is emerging. A large number of bacterial adhesins with individual receptor specificities have been identified. Furthermore, recent research has shown that individual adhesins are prone to rapid microevolution that results in changes in the receptor specificity of individual adhesins. Microbial adhesins are often assembled into complex polymeric organelle structures, however non-organelle adhesins linked to the cell surface as monomers or simple oligomers also exist. This review gives an overview of bacterial adhesins and focuses on some general aspects of their biogenesis and role in bacterial colonization of host cell surfaces and as virulence factors.

PMID:
11043979
DOI:
10.1016/S1438-4221(00)80102-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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