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Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2000 Nov;83(3):F186-92.

Importance of intestinal colonisation in the maturation of humoral immunity in early infancy: a prospective follow up study of healthy infants aged 0-6 months.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland. minna-maija.gronlund@utu.fi

Abstract

AIM:

To evaluate the role of intestinal microflora and early formula feeding in the maturation of humoral immunity in healthy newborn infants.

STUDY DESIGN:

Sixty four healthy infants were studied. Faecal colonisation with Bacteroides fragilis group, Bifidobacterium-like, and Lactobacillus-like bacteria was examined at 1, 2, and 6 months of age, and also the number of IgA-secreting, IgM-secreting, and IgG-secreting cells (detected by ELISPOT) at 0, 2, and 6 months of age.

RESULTS:

Intestinal colonisation with bacteria from the B fragilis group was more closely associated with maturation of IgA-secreting and IgM-secreting cells than colonisation with the other bacterial genera studied or diet. Infants colonised with B fragilis at 1 month of age had more IgA-secreting and IgM-secreting cells/10(6) mononuclear cells at 2 months of age (geometric mean (95% confidence interval) 1393 (962 to 2018) and 754 (427 to 1332) respectively) than infants not colonised (1015 (826 to 1247) and 394 (304 to 511) respectively); p = 0.04 and p = 0.009 respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The type of bacteria colonising the intestine of newborns and the timing may determine the immunomodulation of the naive immune system.

PMID:
11040166
PMCID:
PMC1721174
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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