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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Oct;48(10):1241-51.

Factors related to sleep disturbance in older adults experiencing knee pain or knee pain with radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis.

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1
Department of Exercise Science, School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia 29208, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the types and frequencies of sleep complaints and the biopsychosocial factors associated with sleep disturbance in a large community sample of older adults experiencing knee pain or knee pain with radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA).

DESIGN:

Baseline analyses of an observational prospective study.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

Participants were 429 men and women aged 65 years and older experiencing knee pain or knee pain with radiographic evidence of OA enrolled in the Observational Arthritis Study in Seniors (OASIS).

MEASUREMENTS:

Demographic variables (age, gender, ethnicity, education), health (X-rays of knee rated for OA severity, medical conditions, medication use, smoking status, body mass index, self-rated health), physical functioning (self-rated physical functioning, physical performance), knee pain, and psychosocial functioning (social support, depression) were measured.

RESULTS:

Problems with sleep onset, sleep maintenance, and early morning awakenings occurred at least weekly among 31%, 81%, and 51% of participants, respectively. Bivariate correlates of greater sleep disturbance in those with OA were less education, cardiovascular disease, more arthritic joints, poorer self-rated health, poorer physical functioning, poorer physical performance, knee pain, depression, and less social support. In regression analyses, each set of variables representing the domains of health, physical functioning, pain, and psychosocial functioning contributed to the prediction of sleep disturbance beyond the demographic set. Finally, in a simultaneous model, white race (trend, P = .06), poorer self-rated health, poorer physical functioning, and depressive symptoms were predictive of sleep disturbance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep disturbance is common in older adults experiencing knee pain or knee pain with radiographic evidence of OA and is best understood through the consideration of demographic, physical health, physical functioning, pain, and psychosocial variables. Interventions that take into account the multidetermined nature of sleep disturbance in knee pain or knee OA are most likely to be successful.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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