Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Immunol. 2000 Oct 15;165(8):4428-36.

Notch signaling enhances survival and alters differentiation of 32D myeloblasts.

Author information

1
Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

The Notch transmembrane receptors play important roles in precursor survival and cell fate specification during hematopoiesis. To investigate the function of Notch and the signaling events activated by Notch in myeloid development, we expressed truncated forms of Notch1 or Notch2 proteins that either can or cannot activate the core binding factor 1 (CBF1) in 32D (clone 3) myeloblasts. 32D cells proliferate as blasts in the presence of the cytokines, GM-CSF or IL-3, but they initiate differentiation and undergo granulopoiesis in the presence of granulocyte CSF (G-CSF). 32D cells expressing constitutively active forms of Notch1 or Notch2 proteins that signal through the CBF1 pathway maintained significantly higher numbers of viable cells and exhibited less cell death during G-CSF induction compared with controls. They also displayed enhanced entry into granulopoiesis, and inhibited postmitotic terminal differentiation. In contrast, Notch1 constructs that either lacked sequences necessary for CBF1 binding or that failed to localize to the nucleus had little effect. Elevated numbers of viable cells during G-CSF treatment were also observed in 32D cells overexpressing the basic helix-loop-helix protein (bHLH), HES1, consistent with activation of the CBF1 pathway. Taken together, our data suggest that Notch signaling enhances 32D cell survival, promotes entry into granulopoiesis, and inhibits postmitotic differentiation through a CBF1-dependent pathway.

PMID:
11035081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

LinkOut - more resources

Full Text Sources

Other Literature Sources

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center