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Clin Microbiol Rev. 2000 Oct;13(4):602-14.

Passive immunity in prevention and treatment of infectious diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, UCLA School of Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California 90509-2910, USA. keller@humc.edu

Abstract

Antibodies have been used for over a century in the prevention and treatment of infectious disease. They are used most commonly for the prevention of measles, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tetanus, varicella, rabies, and vaccinia. Although their use in the treatment of bacterial infection has largely been supplanted by antibiotics, antibodies remain a critical component of the treatment of diptheria, tetanus, and botulism. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin can be used to treat certain viral infections in immunocompromised patients (e.g., cytomegalovirus, parvovirus B19, and enterovirus infections). Antibodies may also be of value in toxic shock syndrome, Ebola virus, and refractory staphylococcal infections. Palivizumab, the first monoclonal antibody licensed (in 1998) for an infectious disease, can prevent respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants. The development and use of additional monoclonal antibodies to key epitopes of microbial pathogens may further define protective humoral responses and lead to new approaches for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases.

PMID:
11023960
PMCID:
PMC88952
DOI:
10.1128/cmr.13.4.602-614.2000
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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