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J Dent Res. 2000 Sep;79(9):1652-8.

Low unstimulated salivary flow and subjective oral dryness: association with medication, anxiety, depression, and stress.

Author information

1
Department of Odontology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, UmeƄ University, Sweden. Maud.Bergdahl@odont.umu.se

Abstract

Medication and psychological processes may affect salivary flow and cause subjective oral dryness. The importance of these factors is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of medication, anxiety, depression, and stress with unstimulated salivary flow and subjective oral dryness. We studied 1,202 individuals divided into three groups, and controls. Intake of medication was evaluated. Anxiety, depression, and stress were assessed. Unstimulated salivary flow < 0.1 mL/min and subjective oral dryness were significantly associated with age, female gender, intake of psychotropics, anti-asthmatics, and diuretics. Unstimulated salivary flow < 0.1 mL/min and no subjective oral dryness were significantly associated with age, intake of antihypertensives, and analgesics. Subjective oral dryness and unstimulated salivary flow > 0.1 mL/min were significantly associated with depression, trait anxiety, perceived stress, state anxiety, female gender, and intake of antihypertensives. Age and medication seemed to play a more important role in individuals with hyposalivation, and female gender and psychological factors in individuals with subjective oral dryness.

PMID:
11023259
DOI:
10.1177/00220345000790090301
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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