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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2000 Oct;89(4):1333-9.

Neurocirculatory consequences of intermittent asphyxia in humans.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53705, USA. axie@facstaff.edu

Abstract

We examined the neurocirculatory and ventilatory responses to intermittent asphyxia (arterial O(2) saturation = 79-85%, end-tidal PCO(2) =3-5 Torr above eupnea) in seven healthy humans during wakefulness. The intermittent asphyxia intervention consisted of 20-s asphyxic exposures alternating with 40-s periods of room-air breathing for a total of 20 min. Minute ventilation increased during the intermittent asphyxia period (14.2 +/- 2.0 l/min in the final 5 min of asphyxia vs. 7.5 +/- 0.4 l/min in baseline) but returned to the baseline level within 2 min after completion of the series of asphyxic exposures. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity increased progressively, reaching 175 +/- 12% of baseline in the final 5 min of the intervention. Unlike ventilation, sympathetic activity remained elevated for at least 20 min after removal of the chemical stimuli (150 +/- 10% of baseline in the last 5 min of the recovery period). Intermittent asphyxia caused a small, but statistically significant, increase in heart rate (64 +/- 4 beats/min in the final 5 min of asphyxia vs. 61 +/- 4 beats/min in baseline); however, this increase was not sustained after the return to room-air breathing. These data demonstrate that relatively short-term exposure to intermittent asphyxia causes sympathetic activation that persists after removal of the chemical stimuli. This carryover effect provides a potential mechanism whereby intermittent asphyxia during sleep could lead to chronic sympathetic activation in patients with sleep apnea syndrome.

PMID:
11007566
DOI:
10.1152/jappl.2000.89.4.1333
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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