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Pflugers Arch. 2000 Sep;440(5):679-84.

Structural requirements for determining the substrate affinity of peptide transporters PEPT1 and PEPT2.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacy, Kyoto University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Japan.

Abstract

Peptide transporters PEPT1 and PEPT2 transport numerous compounds including small peptides, peptide-like drugs and nonpeptidic compounds such as valacyclovir. PEPT1 and PEPT2 show low and high affinity for most substrates, respectively, but beta-lactam antibiotics without an alpha-amino group are the only known substrates that prefer PEPT1 to PEPT2. The aim of this study was to compare the recognition and affinity of various substrates between rat PEPT1 and rat PEPT2, and to determine the structural requirements influencing the substrate affinity. [14C]Glycylsarcosine uptake by PEPT1- or PEPT2-expressing transfectant was inhibited by di- and tripeptides, but not by amino acids, tetrapeptides or most cyclic dipeptides. All dipeptides and tripeptides examined showed more potent inhibition of [14C]glycylsarcosine uptake via PEPT2 than via PEPT1, irrespective of their charge and structure. Modification of the alpha-amino group of dipeptides reduced their substrate affinity to both transporters, as compared to unmodified dipeptides, but these dipeptides still showed potent inhibitory effects on PEPT2. Among the nonpeptidic substrates tested, only the eight-amino-octanoic acid displayed stronger inhibition of [14C]glycylsarcosine uptake in PEPT1 than in PEPT2. These findings suggest that alpha- or beta-amino carbonyl function is the key structure responsible for the higher affinity for PEPT2 than for PEPT1.

PMID:
11007306
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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