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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;54(9):732-7.

The associations of a marine diet with plasma lipids, blood glucose, blood pressure and obesity among the inuit in Greenland.

Author information

1
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. p.bjerregaard@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyse the associations between the intake of fish and marine mammals and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, ie lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, blood pressure and obesity, in a population whose average consumption of n-3 fatty acids is high compared with Western countries.

DESIGN:

Information was obtained from a population survey in Greenland: interview data, clinical data and fasting blood samples were obtained from a random sample of Inuit from three towns and four villages.

SUBJECTS:

Two-hundred and fifty-nine adult Inuit (74% of the sample).

RESULTS:

Marine diet was positively associated with serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and blood glucose and inversely with very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and triglyceride. Association with low-density lipoprotein (LDL), diastolic and systolic blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index were inconsistent and not statistically significant. The pattern was similar within groups with low, medium and high consumption of marine food.

CONCLUSIONS:

There are statistically significant associations between the consumption of marine food and certain lipid fractions in the blood also in this population with a very high average intake of marine food. The observation that blood glucose is positively associated with marine diet in a population survey is new and should be repeated. There was good agreement between the results for the reported consumption of seal and those for the biomarkers.

SPONSORSHIP:

The study was financially supported by the Greenland Home Rule, Directorate of Health and Research, the Commission for Scientific Research in Greenland, and the Danish Medical Research Council.

PMID:
11002386
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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