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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Sep;32(9):1648-54.

Effect of training status and relative exercise intensity on physiological responses in men.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study examined the effect of training status and relative exercise intensity on physiological responses to endurance exercise in humans.

METHODS:

Seven endurance trained (TR: peak oxygen uptake [VO2peak] = 65.8 +/- 2.4 mL x kg(-1) min(-1)) and six untrained (UT: VO2peak = 46.2 +/- 1.9 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) men cycled for 60 min, either at a work rate corresponding to approximately 70% VO2peak or approximately 95% lactate threshold (LT).

RESULTS:

The work rate and relative exercise intensity (i.e., % VO2peak) for UT 95% LT were lower (P < 0.01) than for all of the other trials. Although the work rate for UT 70% VO2peak was lower (P < 0.001) than for TR 70% VO2peak and TR 95% LT, average heart rate (HR) for the trial was higher (P < 0.01) throughout exercise in UT 70% VO2peak compared with all of the other trials. Plasma lactate and ammonia concentrations were greater (P < 0.01) during exercise in UT 70% VO2peak compared with all of the other trials. There was a tendency (P = 0.077) for plasma hypoxanthine to be greater at 60 min in UT 70% VO2peak compared with the other trials. At no time were any of the plasma metabolite concentrations different between the UT 95% LT, TR 95% LT and TR 70% VO2peak trials.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data demonstrate that HR and plasma markers of metabolic stress were greater in UT compared with TR when exercise was performed at 70% VO2peak but were similar during exercise at 95% LT.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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