Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Can J Anaesth. 2000 Sep;47(9):843-8.

Intubating laryngeal mask for fibreoptic intubation--particularly useful during neck stabilization.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi City, Osaka, Japan. asait@takii.kmu.ac.jp

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the ease of fibrescope-assisted tracheal intubation while the patient's head and neck were placed in the neutral or the manual in-line position, and to determine if the intubating laryngeal mask facilitated fibreoptic intubation in these positions.

METHODS:

In 84 patients, the patient's head and neck were placed in the neutral position (pillow placed under occiput), and in another 40 patients the head and neck were stabilized by the manual in-line method (no pillows under occiput). In both groups, after induction of anesthesia with 2.0-2.5 mgxkg(-1) propofol, 50-100 microg fentanyl and 1.0 mgxkg(-1) vecuronium, patients were allocated randomly into two groups: in Group C tracheal intubation was attempted using only a fibrescope, whereas in Group L fibreoptic intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask was attempted.

RESULTS:

In group C the success rate of fibreoptic tracheal intubation within two minutes was higher in the neutral position (31 of 42 patients (73%)) than in the manual in-line position (8 of 20 patients (40%)). In contrast, in group L the success rate was similar between the two positions. Tracheal intubation was easier in group L than in group C (P < 0.01 or 0.001) and the time for intubation was shorter in group L than in group C in both head and neck positions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fibreoptic tracheal intubation was more difficult in the manual in-line position than in the neutral position. The intubating laryngeal mask facilitated fibreoptic intubation in both positions.

PMID:
10989852
DOI:
10.1007/BF03019662
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center