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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Sep;162(3 Pt 1):1095-101.

Multiorgan nuclear factor kappa B activation in a transgenic mouse model of systemic inflammation.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Departments of Microbiology and Immunology, and Cell Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA. timothy.blackwell@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

We utilized a line of transgenic mice expressing Photinus luciferase complementary DNA (cDNA) under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB)-dependent promoter (from the 5' human immunodeficiency virus-1 [HIV-1] long terminal repeat) to examine the role of NF-kappaB activation in the pathogenesis of systemic inflammation induced by bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). After intraperitoneal injection of E. coli LPS, these mice displayed a time- and dose-dependent, organ-specific pattern of luciferase expression, showing that NF-kappaB-dependent gene transcription is transiently activated in multiple organs by systemic LPS administration. Luciferase expression in liver could be specifically blocked by intravenous administration of replication-deficient adenoviral vectors expressing a dominant inhibitor of NF-kappaB (IkappaB-alphaDN), confirming that luciferase gene expression is a surrogate marker for NF-kappaB activation in this line of mice. After treatment with intraperitoneal LPS, the mice were found to have increased lung tissue messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of a variety of cytokines that are thought to be NF-kappaB-dependent, as well as elevated serum concentrations of presumed NF-kappaB-dependent cytokines. In lung tissue homogenates, a close correlation was identified between luciferase activity and KC levels. These studies show that systemic treatment with LPS orchestrates a multiorgan NF-kappaB-dependent response that likely regulates the pathobiology of systemic inflammation.

PMID:
10988136
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm.162.3.9906129
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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