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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2000 Sep;36(3):751-7.

Low apolipoprotein A-IV plasma concentrations in men with coronary artery disease.

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1
Institute of Medical Biology and Human Genetics, University of Innsbruck, Austria. Florian.Kronenberg@uibk.ac.at

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this study was to evaluate the relation between apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) plasma concentrations and coronary artery disease (CAD).

BACKGROUND:

Experimental in vitro and in vivo studies favor apoA-IV to be protective against the development of atherosclerosis. Mice that overexpress either human or mouse apoA-IV demonstrated a significant reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesions compared with control mice. Data on apoA-IV plasma concentrations and CAD in humans are lacking.

METHODS:

We determined in two independent case-control studies of a Caucasian and an Asian Indian population whether apoA-IV plasma concentrations are related to the presence of angiographically assessed CAD.

RESULTS:

Plasma apoA-IV levels were significantly lower in 114 male Caucasian subjects with angiographically defined CAD when compared with 114 age-adjusted male controls (10.2 +/-3.8 mg/dL vs. 15.1 +/- 4.0 mg/dL, p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the association between apoA-IV levels and CAD was independent of the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. The inverse relationship between plasma levels of apoA-IV and the presence of CAD was confirmed in an independent sample of 68 male Asian Indians with angiographically documented CAD and 68 age-matched controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this cross-sectional study demonstrate for the first time an association between low apoA-IV concentrations and CAD in humans and suggest that apoA-IV may play an antiatherogenic role in humans.

PMID:
10987595
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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