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J Behav Med. 2000 Aug;23(4):377-91.

The negative effect of decreasing the level of activity in coping with pain in rheumatoid arthritis: an increase in psychological distress and disease impact.

Author information

1
Sint Maartenskliniek Research, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of coping with pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on subsequent changes in psychological distress and disease impact. A sample of 109 randomly selected RA patients was asked to participate in a longitudinal study. Patients were measured at baseline and after 3 years. Both measurements were completed in 80 patients. At each assessment the following variables were assessed: disease activity, pain, physical and psychological distress, disease impact, and coping. The relation between coping with pain at baseline and subsequent changes in psychological distress and disease impact was analyzed using stepwise regression. Disease status variables assessed at baseline and after 3 years were entered in the regression analysis as control variables. Results show that cognitive coping with pain at baseline was not related to subsequent changes in psychological distress or disease impact. On the other hand, behavioral pain coping assessed at baseline was related to subsequent changes in psychological distress and disease impact. "Decreasing activity" was related to an increase in self-reported psychological distress and disease impact after controlling for disease status at both assessments. It was concluded that cognitive pain coping did not predict any subsequent changes in psychological distress or disease impact. "Decreasing activity" as a behavioral pain coping style has a negative effect on subsequent changes in psychological distress and disease impact.

PMID:
10984866
DOI:
10.1023/a:1005552901946
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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