Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gastroenterology. 2000 Sep;119(3):829-36.

Activation of adenosine A1-receptor pathway induces edema formation in the pancreas of rats.

Author information

1
Third Department of Internal Medicine, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan. asato@int3.med.tohoku.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Adenosine has been shown to modulate various pathophysiologic conditions through receptor-mediated mechanisms. However, the role of adenosine in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has not been described. We examined the effect of adenosine-receptor stimulation or inhibition on the pathologic changes of the pancreas.

METHODS:

Rats received intraperitoneal injections of selective agonists of A1, A2a, and A3 adenosine receptors: 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), CGS-21680 (CGS), or 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-be ta-D-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA), respectively. Serum amylase activity and pathologic changes of the pancreas were evaluated. The effects of a specific A1-receptor antagonist (FK-838) on the pathologic findings of cerulein- and taurocholate-induced pancreatitis were also examined.

RESULTS:

Administration of a selective A1 agonist induced hyperamylasemia and morphologic changes in the pancreas characterized by interstitial edema and leukocyte infiltration; neither A2a nor A3 agonist produced such changes. Treatment with an A1-receptor antagonist significantly attenuated the outcome induced by A1 agonist stimulation. In addition, the A1-receptor antagonist significantly ameliorated pancreatic edema in both pancreatitis models, although it did not improve the acinar cell damage of the pancreas or the increase of serum amylase.

CONCLUSIONS:

Activation of the adenosine A1-receptor pathway may have an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

PMID:
10982777
DOI:
10.1053/gast.2000.16502
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center