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Immunity. 2000 Aug;13(2):233-42.

Lymphoid/neuronal cell surface OX2 glycoprotein recognizes a novel receptor on macrophages implicated in the control of their function.

Author information

1
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

The OX2 membrane glycoprotein (CD200) is expressed on a broad range of tissues including lymphoid cells, neurons, and endothelium. We report the characterization of an OX2 receptor (OX2R) that is a novel protein restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. OX2 and its receptor are both cell surface glycoproteins containing two immunoglobulin-like domains and interact with a dissociation constant of 2.5 microM and koff 0.8 s(-1), typical of many leukocyte protein membrane interactions. Pervanandate treatment of macrophages showed that OX2R could be phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Blockade of the OX2-OX2R interaction with an OX2R mAb exacerbated the disease model experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. These data, together with data from an OX2-deficient mouse (R. M. Hoek et al., submitted), suggest that myeloid function can be controlled in a tissue-specific manner by the OX2-OX2R interaction.

PMID:
10981966
DOI:
10.1016/s1074-7613(00)00023-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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