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Am J Med Sci. 2000 Aug;320(2):117-23.

Initial observations on the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV-associated autoimmune thrombocytopenia.

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1
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98111, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) occurs in as many as 40% of patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We sought to evaluate the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on platelet counts in such patients.

METHODS:

Data collected from 11 homosexual men with HIV-associated ITP and < or = 50 x 10(9) platelets were analyzed after they were placed on HAART. At initial evaluation, 7 patients were antiretroviral naive, 2 were taking zidovudine alone, and 2 were receiving combination antiretroviral therapy for known HIV infection. For 6 patients with <30 x 10(9) platelets, prednisone was initially coadministered with HAART. The primary outcome measure was the platelet count response to HAART, which was measured weekly until counts had normalized on 3 consecutive occasions, then every 3 months while on HAART. Secondary outcome measures were HIV-viral RNA levels and CD4+ cell counts.

RESULTS:

One month after the initiation of HAART, 10 evaluable patients had an increase in mean platelet count. This improvement was sustained at 6 and 12 months' follow-up for 9 of 10 evaluable patients. Increases in mean platelet count at 6 and 12 months of the 9 responders were statistically significant. The range of follow-up in the 9 responders is 21 to 46 months (median, 30 months), with no thrombocytopenic relapses. The 9 long-term platelet responders have been maintained on HAART and at 12 months had a mean reduction of > 1.5 log10 in HIV viral RNA serum levels and a marked improvement in CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count.

CONCLUSION:

HAART seems to be effective in improving platelet counts in the setting of HIV-associated ITP, enhancing CD4+ cell counts, and reducing HIV viral loads.

PMID:
10981487
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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