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J Am Coll Health. 2000 Jul;49(1):27-33.

Men, masculinity, and cancer: risk-factor behaviors, early detection, and psychosocial adaptation.

Author information

1
Department of Counseling Psychology, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306, USA. 00drnicholas@bsu.edu

Abstract

Men and women experience cancer differently. More men than women get cancer, more men than women die from cancer, and men usually adapt less well than women after a cancer diagnosis. In this article, the author suggests that the consequences of male gender-role socialization may explain some of these differences. The focus of the article is on (a) cancer risk-factor behaviors; (b) screening, early detection, symptom recognition, and help seeking; and (c) psychosocial adaptation. Research that has identified gender differences is reviewed and the impact of male gender-role socialization is offered as a potential explanation for these differences. In addition, practice implications for college health professionals are offered.

PMID:
10967881
DOI:
10.1080/07448480009596279
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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