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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2000 Aug 31;54(2-3):123-31.

Ankyloglossia: controversies in management.

Author information

1
Division of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Packard Childrens Hospital at Stanford, 725 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94303, USA. anna.messner@medcenter.stanford.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine current beliefs regarding ankyloglossia and its treatment.

DESIGN:

Anonymous written survey.

PARTICIPANTS:

Otolaryngologists (OTO, n=423), pediatricians (PD, n=425), speech pathologists (SP, n=400), and lactation consultants (LC, n=350) were randomly selected from professional membership lists, with a response rate of 209 (49%), 235 (55%), 150 (37.5%), and 203 (58%), respectively.

CLINICAL FINDINGS:

Sixty-nine percent of LCs, but a minority of physician respondents, believe tongue-tie is frequently associated with feeding problems. Sixty percent of OTOs, 50% of SPs, but only 23% of PDs believe tongue-tie is at least sometimes associated with speech difficulties. Sixty-seven percent of OTOs versus 21% of PDs believe tongue-tie is at least sometimes associated with social/mechanical issues. Surgery is recommended at least sometimes for feeding, speech, and social/mechanical issues by 53, 74, and 69% of OTOs, respectively, but by only 21%, 29%, and 19% of PDs.

CONCLUSION:

The significance of ankyloglossia in children remains controversial, both within, and between, specialty groups.

PMID:
10967382
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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