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Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;72(3):796-803.

Total-body skeletal muscle mass: development and cross-validation of anthropometric prediction models.

Author information

1
Obesity Research Center, St Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.

Erratum in

  • Am J Clin Nutr 2001 May;73(5):995.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Skeletal muscle (SM) is a large body compartment of biological importance, but it remains difficult to quantify SM with affordable and practical methods that can be applied in clinical and field settings.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to develop and cross-validate anthropometric SM mass prediction models in healthy adults.

DESIGN:

SM mass, measured by using whole-body multislice magnetic resonance imaging, was set as the dependent variable in prediction models. Independent variables were organized into 2 separate formulas. One formula included mainly limb circumferences and skinfold thicknesses [model 1: height (in m) and skinfold-corrected upperarm, thigh, and calf girths (CAG, CTG, and CCG, respectively; in cm)]. The other formula included mainly body weight (in kg) and height (model 2). The models were developed and cross-validated in nonobese adults [body mass index (in kg/m(2)) < 30].

RESULTS:

Two SM (in kg) models for nonobese subjects (n = 244) were developed as follows: SM = Ht x (0.00744 x CAG(2) + 0.00088 x CTG(2) + 0.00441 x CCG(2)) + 2.4 x sex - 0.048 x age + race + 7.8, where R:(2) = 0.91, P: < 0.0001, and SEE = 2.2 kg; sex = 0 for female and 1 for male, race = -2.0 for Asian, 1.1 for African American, and 0 for white and Hispanic, and SM = 0.244 x BW + 7.80 x Ht + 6.6 x sex - 0.098 x age + race - 3.3, where R:(2) = 0.86, P: < 0.0001, and SEE = 2.8 kg; sex = 0 for female and 1 for male, race = -1.2 for Asian, 1.4 for African American, and 0 for white and Hispanic.

CONCLUSION:

These 2 anthropometric prediction models, the first developed in vivo by using state-of-the-art body-composition methods, are likely to prove useful in clinical evaluations and field studies of SM mass in nonobese adults.

Comment in

PMID:
10966902
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/72.3.796
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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