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Neuropharmacology. 2000 Aug 23;39(11):2205-13.

Effects of caffeine and paracetamol alone or in combination with acetylsalicylic acid on prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in rat microglial cells.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Freiburg Medical School, Hauptstr. 5, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany. bernd_fiebich@psyallg.ukl.uni-freiburg.de

Abstract

Paracetamol has mild analgesic and antipyretic properties and is, along with acetylsalicylic acid, one of the most popular "over the counter" analgesic agents. However, the mechanism underlying its clinical effects is unknown. Another drug whose mechanism of action is unknown is caffeine, which is often used in combination with other analgesics, augmenting their effect. We investigated the inhibitory effect of paracetamol and caffeine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)- and prostaglandin (PG)E(2)-synthesis in primary rat microglial cells and compared it with the effect of acetylsalicylic acid, salicylic acid, and dipyrone. Furthermore, combinations of these drugs were used to investigate a possible synergistic inhibitory effect on PGE(2)-synthesis. Both paracetamol (IC(50)=7.45 microM) and caffeine (IC(50)=42.5 microM) dose-dependently inhibited microglial PGE(2) synthesis. In combination with acetylsalicylic acid (IC(50)=3.12 microM), both substances augmented the inhibitory effect of acetylsalicylic acid on LPS-induced PGE(2)-synthesis. Whereas paracetamol inhibited only COX enzyme activity, caffeine also inhibited COX-2 protein synthesis. These results are compatible with the view that the clinical activity of paracetamol and caffeine is due to inhibition of COX. Furthermore, these results may help explain the clinical experience of an adjuvant analgesic effect of caffeine and paracetamol when combined with acetylsalicylic acid.

PMID:
10963764
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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