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J Gen Intern Med. 2000 Jul;15(7):462-9.

The doctor-patient relationship and HIV-infected patients' satisfaction with primary care physicians.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, MA 02115, USA. lsull@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the extent to which perceptions of specific aspects of the doctor-patient relationship are related to overall satisfaction with primary care physicians among HIV-infected patients.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal, observational study of HIV-infected persons new to primary HIV care. Data were collected at enrollment and approximately 6 months later by in-person interview.

SETTING:

Two urban medical centers in the northeastern United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

Patients seeking primary HIV care for the first time.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

The primary outcome measure was patient-reported satisfaction with a primary care physician measured 6 months after initiating primary HIV care. Patients who were more comfortable discussing personal issues with their physicians (P =. 021), who perceived their primary care physicians as more empathetic (P =.001), and who perceived their primary care physicians as more knowledgeable with respect to HIV (P =.002) were significantly more satisfied with their primary care physicians, adjusted for characteristics of the patient and characteristics of primary care. Collectively, specific aspects of the doctor-patient relationship explained 56% of the variation in overall satisfaction with the primary care physician.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients' perceptions of their primary care physician's HIV knowledge and empathy were highly related to their satisfaction with this physician. Satisfaction among HIV-infected patients was not associated with patients' sociodemographic characteristics, HIV risk characteristics, alcohol and drug use, health status, quality of life, or concordant patient-physician gender and racial matching.

PMID:
10940132
PMCID:
PMC1495486
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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