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Urology. 2000 Aug 1;56(2):311-4.

Increased urinary transforming growth factor-beta(1) excretion in children with posterior urethral valves.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Nephrology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Patients with posterior urethral valves (PUV) are at significant risk for progression to end-stage renal disease, despite early correction of the obstruction. Experimental models of urinary obstruction demonstrate increased renal expression of the profibrotic inflammatory mediator, transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)). Urinary TGF-beta(1) excretion is elevated in certain glomerular diseases, but has not been well studied in patients with obstructive lesions. The objective of this study was to examine urinary TGF-beta(1) excretion in children with PUV.

METHODS:

Fourteen patients with PUV, aged 3.2 to 14.5 years, with estimated glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) of 12.8 to 139 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were enrolled. Sixteen normal subjects (9 male, 7 female), aged 4.3 to 20.5 years, served as controls. Total urinary TGF-beta(1) concentration was assayed by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, and expressed as a ratio to urinary creatinine concentration.

RESULTS:

Urinary TGF-beta(1) excretion was significantly greater in patients with PUV (range 0 to 0.063, median 0.019 ng/mg urine creatinine) compared with that of healthy controls (range 0 to 0.022, median 0.005 ng/mg urine creatinine) (P <0.01). There was no correlation between urinary TGF-beta(1) excretion and estimated GFR, past urinary diversion surgery, or bladder wall thickening. Among healthy controls, urinary TGF-beta(1) was not correlated with age or gender.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results from this study suggest that TGF-beta(1) may contribute to progressive renal insufficiency in patients with PUV. Further studies are indicated to determine if agents that affect TGF-beta(1) expression, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, can slow the progression of renal disease in PUV.

PMID:
10925100
DOI:
10.1016/s0090-4295(00)00591-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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