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Am J Med. 2000 Jun 15;108(9):705-9.

The health of mothers of children with cutaneous neonatal lupus erythematosus differs from that of mothers of children with congenital heart block.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Neonatal lupus erythematosus is caused by the transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of connective tissue disorders in mothers of children with cutaneous neonatal lupus erythematosus, as compared with the risk in mothers of children with congenital heart block, which is also often caused by maternal autoantibodies.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

We prospectively studied all mothers of children with cutaneous neonatal lupus erythematosus during a 14-year period at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We identified 28 mothers, of whom 24 were eligible for study. The health and antibody status of the mothers were determined at the birth of the child and at followup.

RESULTS:

All mothers had anti-Ro antibodies at the time of birth. Initially 10 mothers were healthy and 14 mothers had either a defined (n = 9) or an undifferentiated (n = 5) autoimmune disorder. At a mean follow-up of 7 years, 13 (1 of whom had died) had a defined connective tissue disease, and 5 had an undifferentiated autoimmune disorder. Only 6 (25%) remained asymptomatic. By comparison, 36 (56%) of 64 mothers of children with congenital heart block were asymptomatic at follow-up (P <0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

The majority of mothers of children with cutaneous neonatal lupus erythematosus had a defined or undifferentiated autoimmune disorder at the time of the child's birth, and others developed these conditions during follow-up. The health of these mothers appears to differ from that of mothers of children with congenital heart block.

PMID:
10924646
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9343(00)00408-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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