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J Natl Med Assoc. 2000 Jun;92(6):281-4.

Changes in radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy rates for African Americans and whites.

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1
Division of Cellular Biology, Hektoen Institute for Medical Research, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

Abstract

There are racial differences in prostate cancer outcomes. One variable influencing end results is treatment for cure: either radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this report is to determine changes in diagnosis rates of localized prostate cancer between the years before prostate-specific antigen (PSA) use (1973-1988) and the years after PSA use (1989-1996), to evaluate differences in RP and RT rates between the pre-PSA and post-PSA eras, to assess differences in RP and RT rates between African Americans and whites between these intervals. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data were used and evaluated. Both African Americans and whites had statistically increased rates of localized prostate cancer diagnosed (70.4 and 49.0 in 1973 through 1988 and 123.1 and 84.9 in 1989 through 1996, respectively [p < 0.05]). The differences between the pre-PSA and post-PSA eras for African Americans and whites for RP (3.6 vs. 44.3 and 5.0 vs. 44.9, respectively) and RT (23.6 vs. 61.6 and 17.0 vs. 38.1, respectively) were all significant (p < 0.05). Both African Americans and whites had increased rates of RP from 3.6 and 5.0 to 44.3 and 44.9, respectively, and RT from 23.6 and 17.0 to 61.6 and 38.1 during the pre- and post-PSA years.

PMID:
10918763
PMCID:
PMC2640525
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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