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Acta Paediatr. 2000 Jun;89(6):637-43.

New reference for the age at childhood onset of growth and secular trend in the timing of puberty in Swedish.

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1
Department of Paediatrics , Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.

Abstract

The objectives of the present work were to present a new reference for the age at childhood onset of growth and to investigate the secular trend in the timing of puberty in a community-based normal population in Sweden. A total of 2,432 children with longitudinal length/height data from birth to adulthood were used to determine the two measures by visual inspection of the measured attained length/height and the change in growth velocity displayed on a computer-generated infancy-childhood-puberty (ICP) based growth chart. The series represents a sample of normal full-term children born around 1974 in Göteborg, Sweden. We found about 10% of children were delayed (>12 mo of age) in the childhood onset of growth based on the previous reported normal range, i.e. 14% in boys and 8% in girls. Distribution of the age at childhood onset of growth was skewed. The medians were 10 and 9 mo for boys and girls, respectively. After natural logarithmic transformation, the mean and standard deviation (SD) were 2.29 (anti-log 9.9 mo) and 0.226 for boys, 2.23 (anti-log 9.3 mo) and 0.220 for girls, respectively. The 95% normal ranges were 6.3-15.4 and 6.0-14.3 for boys and girls, respectively. The distribution of the timing of PHV was close to the normal distribution. The mean values were 13.5 y for boys and 11.6 y for girls with 1 y SD for both sexes.

CONCLUSION:

A downward secular trend in the onset of puberty was clearly shown in the population. The age at childhood onset of growth did not correlate with the timing of puberty (r = -0.01 and 0.05, p > 0.7 and 0.1 in boys and girls, respectively). Normal ranges of the age at childhood onset of growth are in need of revise, as this study indicates. The new reference presented here could be a reliable indicator in further studies.

PMID:
10914954
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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