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Laryngorhinootologie. 2000 May;79(5):260-5.

[Inner ear depression after middle ear interventions].

[Article in German]

Author information

1
Bayerische Julius-Maximilians-Universität, Klinik und Poliklinik für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke, Würzburg.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Any type of otosurgical procedure involves the risk of inner ear damage. As middle ear surgery is also performed for functional reasons this risk should be taken into consideration. The aim of this study was to analyse the frequency and the nature of sensorineural hearing loss following chronic ear surgery.

PATIENTS:

A total of 3989 middle ear cases operated on between 1991 and February 1999 at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Würzburg, Germany were studied retrospectively: 781 type I tympanoplasties, 2408 type III tympanoplasties and 800 cases of stapes surgery. The pre- and the postoperative audiograms in the frequency range between 500 and 8000 Hz were analysed and correlated to the different intraoperative findings.

RESULTS:

Sensorineural hearing loss occurred in a total of 1.3% of 2224 patients with normal preoperative bone conduction thresholds: 0.2% became deaf, 0.8% acquired a high tone loss at 4 kHz and in 0.3% patients also 2 kHz was affected. None of the documented intraoperative complications such as bleeding, unexpected opening of a semicircular canal, extensive manipulation at the ossicular chain or a gusher phenoma showed a relevant effect on postoperative bone conduction thresholds. The incidence of high tone loss was not increased in cases of extensive drilling of the temporal bone. An unexpected opening of the vestibulum led to a small, but statistically significant change in postoperative bone conduction thresholds.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results demonstrated that the risk for sensorineural hearing loss caused by middle ear surgery is low. None of the analysed factors seems to be a relevant prognostic risk factor for postoperative inner ear depression.

PMID:
10911601
DOI:
10.1055/s-2000-345
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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