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Am J Public Health. 2000 Jul;90(7):1128-34.

Racial and ethnic differences in the use of cardiovascular procedures: findings from the California Cooperative Cardiovascular Project.

Author information

1
Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga. 30341, USA. esf2@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study used data from the California Cooperative Cardiovascular Project to examine the use of invasive and noninvasive cardiovascular procedures among Whites, African Americans, and Hispanics.

METHODS:

The use of catheterization, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, and several noninvasive tests among all patients 65 years or older with a confirmed acute myocardial infarction in nonfederal hospitals from 1994 to 1995 was studied.

RESULTS:

African Americans (n = 527) were less likely than Whites (n = 9489) to have received catheterization (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.50, 0.76), PTCA (OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.49, 0.85), or CABG surgery (OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.64); somewhat more likely to have received a stress test or an echocardiogram; and equally likely to have received a multiple-gated acquisition scan. Hispanics (n = 689) also were less likely than Whites to have received catheterization (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68, 0.98) or PTCA (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.45, 0.75).

CONCLUSIONS:

African Americans were less likely than Whites to undergo costly invasive cardiovascular procedures. In addition, Hispanics were less likely than Whites to have received catheterization and PTCA.

PMID:
10897193
PMCID:
PMC1446298
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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