Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2000 May-Jun;73(3):356-64.

The effects of acute and developmental temperature on burst swimming speed and myofibrillar ATPase activity in tadpoles of the Pacific tree frog, Hyla regilla.

Author information

  • 1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA. timothy.b.watkins@dartmouth.edu.

Abstract

The effects of acute and developmental temperature on maximum burst swimming speed, body size, and myofibrillar ATPase activity were assessed in tadpoles of the Pacific tree frog, Hyla regilla. Tadpoles from field-collected egg masses were reared in the laboratory at 15 degrees (cool) and 25 degrees C (warm). Body size, maximum burst swimming speed from 5 degrees to 35 degrees C, and tail myofibrillar ATPase activity at 15 degrees and 25 degrees C were measured at a single developmental stage. Burst speed of both groups of tadpoles was strongly affected by test temperature (P<0. 001). Performance maxima spanned test temperatures of 15 degrees -25 degrees C for the cool group and 15 degrees -30 degrees C for the warm group. Burst speed also depended on developmental temperature (P<0.001), even after accounting for variation in body size. At most test temperatures, the cool-reared tadpoles swam faster than the warm-reared tadpoles. Myofibrillar ATPase activity was affected by test temperature (P<0.001). Like swimming speed, enzyme activity was greater in the cool-reared tadpoles than in the warm-reared tadpoles, a difference that was significant when assayed at 15 degrees C (P<0. 01). These results suggest a mechanism for developmental temperature effects on locomotor performance observed in other taxa.

PMID:
10893175
DOI:
10.1086/316744
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for University of Chicago Press
    Loading ...
    Support Center