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Lancet. 2000 Jul 1;356(9223):9-16.

Outcome at 1 year after an invasive compared with a non-invasive strategy in unstable coronary-artery disease: the FRISC II invasive randomised trial. FRISC II Investigators. Fast Revascularisation during Instability in Coronary artery disease.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Lars.Wallentin@card.uas.lul.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Fragmin and Fast Revascularisation during Instability in Coronary artery disease II trial (FRISC II) compared an early invasive with an early non-invasive strategy in unstable coronary-artery disease. We report outcome at 1 year.

METHODS:

2457 patients were randomly assigned invasive or non-invasive treatment and 3 months of dalteparin or placebo. Complete information at 1 year was available for 1222 in the invasive group and 1234 in the non-invasive group. Analyses were by intention to treat.

FINDINGS:

Revascularisation was done within the first 10 days in 71% of the invasive group and 9% of the non-invasive group and within the first year in 78% and 43%. During the first year, 27 (2.2%) patients in the invasive group and 48 (3.9%) in the non-invasive group died (risk ratio 0.57 [95% CI 0.36-0.90], p=0.016). 105 (8.6%) versus 143 (11.6%) had myocardial infarction (0.74 [0.59-0.94], p=0.015). The composite of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 127 (10.4%) versus 174 (14.1%) patients (0.74 [0.60-0.92], p=0.005). There were also reductions in readmission (451 [37%] vs 704 [57%]; 0.67 [0.62-0.72]), and revascularisation after the initial admission (92 [7.5%] vs 383 [31%]; 0.24 [0.20-0.30]). The results did not interact with the dalteparin/placebo allocation.

INTERPRETATION:

After 1 year in 100 patients, an invasive strategy saves 1.7 lives, prevents 2.0 non-fatal myocardial infarctions and 20 readmissions, and provides earlier and better symptom relief at the cost of 15 more patients with coronary-artery bypass grafting and 21 more with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Therefore, an invasive approach should be the preferred strategy in patients with unstable coronary-artery disease and signs of ischaemia on electrocardiography or raised levels of biochemical markers of myocardial damage.

Comment in

PMID:
10892758
DOI:
10.1016/s0140-6736(00)02427-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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