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Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2000 Jul-Aug;11(4):223-9.

Detection of dementia in primary care: the Linköping study.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine and Care, Primary Care, The Health University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden. maria.olafsdottir@soc.liu.se

Abstract

We examined to what extent dementia and cognitive impairment are detected in a primary health care centre. A systematic sample of patients aged 70 years and above, who attended a primary health care centre for a doctor's consultation (n = 350) were examined with a neuropsychiatric examination and an interview with a close informant. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R. Medical records from the health centre were examined for entries on cognitive decline or dementia, other diagnoses and prescribed drugs. The prevalence of dementia was 16.3% and a further 3.1% had questionable dementia. Cognitive disturbances or dementia were noted in case records in 15 out of 57 (26%) demented cases, and in 1 out of 11 (9%) questionable dementias. Compared to non-demented patients, the demented had more diagnoses and a higher number of prescribed drugs. Severity and duration of dementia were associated with an increased detection.

PMID:
10867449
DOI:
10.1159/000017241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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