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Am J Cardiol. 2000 Jul 1;86(1):30-4.

Angiographic and clinical characteristics associated with increased in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous intervention (a pooled analysis of the primary angioplasty in myocardial infarction trials).

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA. Vsddoc@aol.com

Abstract

Advanced age is associated with increased mortality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) but the mechanism remains unclear. We performed a pooled analysis of 3,032 patients from the Primary Angioplasty in Myocardial Infarction (PAMI)-2, Stent-PAMI, and PAMI-No Surgery On Site trials to determine which clinical, hemodynamic, and angiographic characteristics in the elderly were associated with in-hospital death. There were 452 patients aged >/=75 years and 2,580 patients aged <75 years. Older patients had a lower number of risk factors for coronary artery disease but more comorbidities. Acute catheterization demonstrated more 3-vessel disease, higher left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure, lower LV ejection fraction, and higher initial rates of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) trial 2 or 3 flow. Elderly patients were equally likely to undergo percutaneous intervention but had a lower procedural success rate and lower rates of final TIMI 3 flow, and older patients were more likely to have post-AMI complications. In-hospital mortality was 10.2% and 1.8%, respectively (p = 0.001). Cardiac and noncardiac mortality was higher in elderly patients, and no significant differences in causes of death were identified. Multivariate analysis revealed that the strongest predictors of death were age >/=75 years, lower LV ejection fraction, lower final TIMI flow, higher Killip class, need for an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP), and post-AMI stroke/transient ischemic attack, or significant arrhythmia. Despite avoiding thrombolysis, elderly patients remain at increased risk of bleeding, stroke, and other post-AMI complications, and death. Cardiac risk factor analysis and acute catheterization offer prognostic information but do not completely explain the mechanism of increased in-hospital mortality in the elderly.

PMID:
10867088
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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