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Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Nov;38(3):227-39.

Evaluation of a computerized contraceptive decision aid for adolescent patients.

Author information

1
Sonderegger Research Center, School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison 53706, USA. bac@pharmacy.wisc.edu

Abstract

Recent efforts to involve patients more actively in therapeutic decisions have suggested the relevance of computer-based interventions at clinic visits. This paper presents a longitudinal, experimental study evaluating a computer-based contraceptive decision aid in Chicago and Madison family planning clinic visits. Patient interviews at three time points evaluated patient acceptance by and program impact on 949 young women. Both Chicago and Madison patients reported high acceptance. The program resulted in improved short-term knowledge and confidence in oral contraceptive (OC) efficacy for Chicago and Madison patients. In addition, compared to their control group, Madison experimental group patients had higher OC knowledge 1 year after the initial visit and a trend for fewer pregnancies (P < 0.074). Compared to their control group, a higher percent of the Chicago experimental group patients adopted OC's after stating their intention to do so at the initial visit. Exposure to the computer program had no observable impact on the number of months on the oral contraceptive for Chicago or Madison patients. Overall findings suggest the usefulness of informatics tools as a supplement to patient-provider interactions.

PIP:

This paper presents findings of a longitudinal, experimental study which evaluated the effect of a computer-based contraceptive decision aid, the Aid for Contraceptive Decision-Making Program, as a supplement to family planning clinic visits by adolescent patients. Patient interviews at three time points evaluated patient acceptance by and program impact on 949 young women in Chicago and Madison family planning clinics. Both Chicago and Madison patients reported high acceptance. The program also resulted in improved short-term knowledge and confidence in oral contraceptive (OC) efficacy for Chicago and Madison patients. Furthermore, the Madison experimental group patients had higher OC knowledge 1 year after the initial visit and a trend for fewer pregnancies (P 0.074) as compared to their control group. While a higher percentage of the Chicago experimental group patients adopted OCs after stating their intention to do so at the initial visit as compared to the control group. However, exposure to the computer program had no observable impact on the number of months on the OC for Chicago and Madison patients. Overall findings implicate the usefulness of informatics tools as a supplement to patient-provider interactions.

PMID:
10865688
DOI:
10.1016/s0738-3991(99)00014-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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