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Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2000 Jul;28(3):308-17.

Chromosomal alterations in 15 breast cancer cell lines by comparative genomic hybridization and spectral karyotyping.

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1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Soili.Kytola@cmm.ki.se

Abstract

Breast cancer cell lines have been widely used as models in functional and therapeutical studies, but their chromosomal alterations are not well known. We characterized the chromosomal aberrations in 15 commonly used human breast carcinoma cell lines (BT-474, BT-549, CAMA-1, DU4475, MCF7, MDA-MB-134, MDA-MB-157, MDA-MB-361, MDA-MB-436, MPE600, SK-BR-3, T-47D, UACC-812, UACC-893, and ZR-75-1) by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and spectral karyotyping (SKY). By CGH the most frequent gains were detected at 1q, 8q, 20q, 7, 11q13, 17q, 9q, and 16p, whereas losses were most common at 8p, 11q14-qter, 18q, and Xq. SKY revealed a multitude of structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations. Simple translocations, typically consisting of entire translocated chromosome arms, were the most common structural aberrations. Complex marker chromosomes included material from up to seven different chromosomes. Evidence for a cytogenetic aberration not previously described in breast cancer, the isoderivative chromosome, was found in two cell lines. Translocations t(8;11), t(12;16), t(1;16), and t(15;17) were frequently found, although the resulting derivative chromosomes and their breakpoints were strikingly dissimilar. The chromosomes most frequently involved in translocations were 8, 1, 17, 16, and 20. An excellent correlation was found between the number of translocation events found by SKY in the individual cell lines, and the copy number gains and losses detected by CGH, indicating that the majority of translocations are unbalanced. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 28:308-317, 2000.

PMID:
10862037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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