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Fertil Steril. 2000 Jun;73(6):1170-3.

Differences in in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome between white and black women in an inner-city, university-based IVF program.

Author information

1
Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. fsharara@ummc001.ummc.umaryland.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare IVF outcomes between white and black women in an inner-city, university-based IVF program.

DESIGN:

Retrospective study.

SETTING:

University-based IVF program.

PATIENT(S):

Ninety-five white women undergoing 121 cycles and 37 black women undergoing 47 cycles.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Implantation rate and pregnancy rate (PR).

RESULT(S):

Black women constituted 28. 0% of the population and underwent 28.0% of the total cycles. There were no statistically significant differences in age, basal FSH, number of ampules, duration of stimulation, endometrial thickness, P on the day of hCG, cancellation rate, number of oocytes, or embryos transferred. However, the duration of infertility, body mass index (BMI), incidence of tubal-factor infertility, and peak E(2) levels were significantly higher in black women. In addition, a larger proportion of black women required aggressive stimulation than white women (70.2% and 43.0%). Both implantation rates and clinical PRs were significantly lower in black women than in white women (9.8% and 19.2% compared with 23.4% and 42.2%, respectively).

CONCLUSION(S):

Black women have poorer IVF outcomes than white women. These differences can be partly explained by higher BMI, longer duration of infertility, higher incidence of tubal-factor infertility, and higher peak E(2).

PMID:
10856477
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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