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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2000 May;85(5):1834-40.

The plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate are decreased in patients with chronic heart failure in proportion to the severity.

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1
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Japan.

Abstract

Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is the major secretory steroid of the human adrenal glands. The secretion of DHEAS decreases with aging. The incidence of heart failure also rises in the elderly population. We measured the plasma levels of DHEAS and cortisol in 49 patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and 32 age-matched controls and assessed its relation to plasma levels of A-type natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide, biochemical markers of heart failure. Plasma levels of DHEAS were significantly lower in patients with CHF than in controls, whereas there was no significant difference in plasma levels of cortisol between the two groups. In stepwise regression analysis, the plasma level of DHEAS was significantly and independently correlated with age (beta = -0.451; P < 0.0001) and the plasma level of B-type natriuretic peptide (beta = -0.338; P < 0.001), and the plasma cortisol/DHEAS ratio was significantly and independently correlated with the plasma levels of A-type natriuretic peptide (beta = 0.598; P < 0.0001) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (a marker of oxidative stress; beta = 0.252; P < 0.01) and age (beta = 0.171; P < 0.05). These results indicate that the plasma levels of DHEAS are decreased in patients with CHF in proportion to its severity and that oxidative stress is associated with decreased levels of DHEAS in patients with CHF.

PMID:
10843161
DOI:
10.1210/jcem.85.5.6568
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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