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Ann Intern Med. 2000 Jun 6;132(11):880-4.

Lower-extremity edema associated with gene transfer of naked DNA encoding vascular endothelial growth factor.

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1
St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02135, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes angiogenesis and vascular permeability. The extent to which VEGF may cause tissue edema in humans has not been established.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate patients undergoing VEGF gene transfer for evidence of lower-extremity edema.

DESIGN:

Prospective consecutive case series.

SETTING:

Hospital outpatient clinic.

PATIENTS:

62 patients with critical limb ischemia and 28 patients with claudication.

INTERVENTION:

Gene transfer of VEGF DNA.

MEASUREMENTS:

Semiquantitative analysis of lower-extremity edema.

RESULTS:

Lower-extremity edema was observed in 31 of 90 (34%) patients. Edema was less common in patients with claudication than in those with pain at rest (P = 0.016) or ischemic ulcers (P < 0.001), and it was less common in patients with pain at rest than in those with ischemic ulcers (P= 0.017). Treatment was typically limited to a brief course of oral diuretics.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vascular endothelial growth factor may enhance vascular permeability in humans. At the doses of plasmid DNA used in this study, lower-extremity edema responded to oral diuretic therapy and did not seem to be associated with serious sequelae.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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