Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Adolesc Health. 2000 Jun;26(6):392-8.

High-risk adolescents and female condoms: knowledge, attitudes, and use patterns.

Author information

1
Department of Health Studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To explore data on high-risk male and female adolescents' attitudes towards female condoms, compared with male condoms.

METHODS:

Exploratory survey research was utilized with a convenience sample of 65 high-risk adolescents at an emergency homeless shelter. A peer-led intervention was conducted and pre-test and post-test interviews explored barriers to female condom use. The intervention consisted of 15- to 30-minute small group sessions, discussing female condoms' construction; purpose of the rings; efficacy preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STIs); and how to lubricate, insert, and use. Content and Chi-square analyses were utilized.

RESULTS:

Sixty-three percent used male condoms as their primary contraceptive method; almost half (48%) said they always used male condoms, but 44% reported having sex without a male condom at least once in the 2 weeks prior to pre-test. Ninety-five percent had heard of the female condom, half 'good' and 24% 'bad' things, but only 15% had ever used one. At post-test all respondents gave reasons they might use female condoms in the future, and 77% gave reasons why they might not. Most (73%) adolescents said they would still prefer the male to the female condom. The major potential barriers to adolescents' female condom use were not having female condoms available and/or females feeling uncomfortable inserting them.

CONCLUSIONS:

Female condoms should be offered to adolescents as an additional choice rather than as replacements for male condoms. Further research is needed to assure access, availability, and comfort with female condoms and male participation in their use.

PIP:

The aim of this study was to explore data on high-risk male and female adolescents' attitudes towards the female condom as compared with the male condom. Exploratory survey research was utilized with convenience sample of 65 high-risk adolescents at an emergency homeless shelter. A peer-led intervention was conducted and pre- and post-test interviews explored barriers to female condom use. The intervention consisted of 15- to 30-minute small-group sessions, discussing the female condom's construction; purpose of the rings; its efficacy in preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections; and how to lubricate, insert, and use it. Content and Chi-square analyses were utilized. 63% used the male condom as their primary contraceptive method; almost half (48%) said they always used a male condom, but 44% reported having sex without using one at least once in the 2 weeks prior to the pre-test. 95% had heard of the female condom (half had heard "good" things and 24% had heard "bad" things), but only 15% had ever used one. At post-test all respondents gave reasons they might use a female condom in the future, and 77% gave reasons why they might not. Most (73%) adolescents said they would still prefer the male condom to the female condom. The major potential barriers to adolescents' female condom use were not having a female condom available and/or females feeling uncomfortable inserting them. The female condom should be offered to adolescents as an additional choice rather than as a replacement for the male condom. Further research is needed to assure access to, availability of, and comfort with the female condom and male participation in its use.

PMID:
10822180
DOI:
10.1016/s1054-139x(99)00090-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center