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J Dairy Sci. 2000 May;83(5):1016-27.

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of milk from cows offered diets rich in linoleic and linolenic acid.

Author information

1
US Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Madison 53706, USA. trdhiman@cc.usu.edu

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to determine the conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of milk from cows offered diets rich in linoleic and linolenic acid. In experiment 1, 36 cows were assigned to a control and five treatment groups. Cows in the control group received a diet containing 51% forage and 49% grain on a dry matter basis. In the treatment group, grain was partly replaced by either 18% raw cracked soybeans, 18% roasted cracked soybeans, 3.6% soybean oil, 2.2% linseed oil, or 4.4% linseed oil. Experimental diets were fed for 5 wk. Average CLA contents in milk fat from wk 2 through 5 were 0.39% in control and 0.37, 0.77, 2.10, 1.58, and 1.63% of total fatty acids in the raw soybean, roasted soybeans, soybean oil, 2.2% linseed oil, and 4.4% linseed oil treatments, respectively. In experiment 2, 36 cows were assigned to a control and 5 treatment groups. Cows in the control group received a diet containing 55% forage and 45% grain. In the treatment groups, grain was partly replaced by soybean oil at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, or by linseed oil at 1.0% of the dietary dry matter. Experimental diets were fed for 5 wk. Average CLA contents in milk fat from wk 2 through 5 were 0.50% in control and 0.75, 0.76, 1.45, 2.08, and 0.73% of total fatty acids in 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 soybean oil and 1.0% linseed oil treatments, respectively. Diets rich in linoleic or linolenic acid can increase CLA content of milk when dietary oil is accessible to the rumen microorganisms.

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