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J Pediatr Psychol. 2000 Mar;25(2):59-68.

Intellectual, neuropsychological, and academic functioning in long-term survivors of leukemia.

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1
University of Otago.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) on children's cognitive functioning.

METHOD:

Participants were long-term survivors of ALL treated with cranial irradiation and central nervous system (CNS) chemotherapy (n = 20), or CNS chemotherapy only (n = 21), healthy children (n = 21), and children with chronic asthma (n = 21). The groups were compared on measures of intellectual, neuropsychological, and academic functioning.

RESULTS:

CNS chemotherapy, with and without cranial irradiation, was associated with significantly lower levels of intellectual and academic functioning. Children with chronic asthma obtained lower scores than healthy controls, but these differences were not significant. Tests of neuropsychological functioning did not consistently separate the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

CNS chemotherapy and, to a lesser extent, chronic illness both contribute to the poorer performance of long-term survivors of ALL on measures of intellectual and academic functioning.

PMID:
10820944
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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