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J Agric Food Chem. 2000 May;48(5):1462-5.

In vivo antioxidative activity of propolis evaluated by the interaction with vitamins C and E and the level of lipid hydroperoxides in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Nara Women's University, Nara 630-8506, Japan.

Abstract

In vivo antioxidative activity of propolis was evaluated on the basis of ameliorative effects on the oxidative stress induced by vitamin E deficiency in rats. The control group was fed vitamin E-deficient diet, and the propolis group was fed vitamin E-deficient diet supplemented with 1% of propolis for 4 and 8 weeks. Comparisons were made in tissue concentrations of vitamin C, vitamin E, and lipid hydroperoxides between these groups. No significant difference was observed in tissue vitamin E concentration between these groups after both 4 and 8 weeks. After 4 weeks, the plasma vitamin C concentration of the propolis group was significantly higher than that of the control group. After 8 weeks, the tissue concentrations of vitamin C in the kidney, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine of the propolis group were significantly higher than those of the control group. These results suggest that some components of propolis are absorbed to circulate in the blood and behave as a hydrophilic antioxidant that saves vitamin C. The concentration of lipid hydroperoxides in the large intestine of the propolis group was significantly lower than that of the control group after 8 weeks. These results suggest that propolis exerts its antioxidative effect where it is assumed to accumulate, such as on the kidney, where it is excreted, and on the gastrointestinal tract, where propolis influences these tissues even from the outside of the cell.

PMID:
10820043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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