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Surgery. 2000 May;127(5):498-505.

Long-term survival and prognostic factors in the surgical treatment of mass-forming type cholangiocarcinoma.

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  • 1Hepato Biliary Pancreatic Surgery Division, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mass-forming type cholangiocarcinoma is a distinct from of cholangiocellular carcinoma, with pathologic and biologic behavior different from those of other types. The clinical consequences of these differences have never been clarified.

METHODS:

Fifty-two consecutive patients (32 men and 20 women, mean age 62 years) with mass-forming type cholangiocarcinoma that had been treated with curative surgical resection between 1980 and 1998 were retrospectively evaluated. Long-term survival and disease-free survival were calculated, and univariate and multivariate analysis of various prognostic factors was conducted.

RESULTS:

The 30-day postoperative mortality rate was 2%, and the overall and disease-free 5-year survival rates were 36% and 34%, respectively. Univariate analysis identified 5 significant risk factors for overall survival: surgical margin, lymph node metastasis, lymph node dissection, vascular invasion, and left-side location of the main tumor. Two risk factors were identified for disease-free survival: surgical margin and lymph node metastasis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that surgical margin, lymph node metastasis, and vascular invasion were independently significant variables for overall survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first reported study on the effectiveness of liver resection for the treatment of mass-forming type cholangiocarcinoma, showing that surgical therapy can prolong survival if local radicality can be achieved and lymph-node metastases are absent.

PMID:
10819057
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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