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Ophthalmology. 2000 May;107(5):909-19.

Evaluation of foldable intraocular lenses in patients with uveitis.

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1
Division of Immunity and Infection, University of Birmingham, England.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate various foldable posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs) after phacoemulsification in patients with uveitis.

DESIGN:

A prospective, noncomparative, interventional case series.

PARTICIPANTS:

Forty-nine consecutive patients (60 eyes) with various types of uveitis (anterior, n = 20; posterior, n = 1; panuveitis, n = 37, intermediate, n = 2).

INTERVENTION:

All patients underwent phacoemulsification with foldable posterior chamber IOL implantation. All eyes were free of active inflammation at the time of surgery. A variety of IOL biomaterials were implanted: acrylic (n = 30), silicone (n = 17), and hydrogel (n = 13).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Detailed examination was performed by one masked observer. Several parameters were compared for each implant biomaterial, including level of best corrected Snellen visual acuity at final follow-up, presence of posterior synechiae, anterior capsular phimosis, posterior capsule opacification, and the degree of cellular deposits on the IOL optic.

RESULTS:

There were 26 males and 23 females, aged 9 to 83 years (mean, 48 years). Follow-up ranged from 1 to 33 months (mean, 17.03 months). At final follow-up, 56 eyes (93.3%) had an improvement in visual acuity compared with preoperative levels as follows: 34 eyes (56.6%) achieved an improvement of four or more Snellen lines, and 44 eyes (73.3%) achieved 20/30 or better. Giant cells, observed on the IOL optic in 19 eyes (31.7%), were most often seen on the acrylic biomaterial at the 1-month follow-up, although this was not found to be statistically significant. Scratch marks produced by the lens-introducing forceps were seen in 24 eyes (40.0%), mainly on the acrylic and hydrogel optics. Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) occurred in 49 eyes (81.7%), with only 5 eyes requiring laser capsulotomy. There was no association between PCO and the various lens biomaterials. Other causes for reduced visual acuity included glaucomatous optic neuropathy (n = 5) and cystoid macular edema (n = 8).

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of foldable IOLs in eyes with uveitis is safe, but the optimal biomaterial has yet to be found.

PMID:
10811083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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