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Ophthalmology. 2000 May;107(5):889-95.

Rand-Stein analgesia protocol for cataract surgery.

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1
Rand Eye Institute, Pompano Beach, Florida 33064, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the safety and efficacy of an analgesia protocol that enables the surgeon to maintain control over an alert patient experiencing seemingly painless ambulatory cataract surgery, while eliminating the risks and side effects associated with general, local, topical, and intracameral anesthesia.

DESIGN:

Noncomparative, interventional case series.

PARTICIPANTS:

Five thousand one hundred sixty-eight consecutive cataract surgery cases operated on by the same surgeon from April 1, 1993 through June 1, 1998.

METHODS:

This technique produces profound ocular analgesia, avoiding any undesired sedative effects, using very low-dose, titrated, intravenous alfentanil. Complete control of the uncooperative patient, including lid squeezing and ocular and general body movements, is obtainable whenever necessary using very low-dose, titrated, intravenous methohexital.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Success was defined as surgery completed in a controlled manner without the need to convert to general, local, topical, or intracameral anesthesia and the patient's experience being perceived as pain free.

RESULTS:

One hundred percent of the cases were successful without ever deviating from the protocol.

CONCLUSIONS:

This analgesia protocol offers advantages for cataract surgery. It virtually eliminates the morbidity of cataract surgery associated with other anesthesia techniques while providing excellent and reliable control. It allows for an immediate postoperative recovery with instantaneous vision restoration. These patients are generally awake, alert, and retain their protective reflexes.

PMID:
10811080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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